Tomatillo Salsa with Fired Serrano Chilies


Yet another variation on my fresh, traditional salsa verde. In this recipe, the serrano chilies are fire-roasted until charred. This method adds a subtle, complex flavor that is distinctively different. You may choose to fire the peppers on a grill, gas burner or with a propane torch.  Any of these methods work great.  There’s no need to peel them afterward — just stem them and pulse in your food processor until the desired consistency is achieved.  Note that a pinch of ground toasted whole cumin seed is also added.  The result?  Perfection.

In many traditional Mexican salsa recipes the tomatillos are simmered and then blended. Culturally, each has its place — and people seem to be vehemently polarized on their opinion of which they like better.

I love this version; it is very refreshing on a hot summer day.


Ingredients:

12-16 fresh tomatillos, husked, washed and cored
6 large, fresh serrano chili peppers
1 medium onion, peeled
3 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed (try roasting it, as an option)
1/2 cup washed and trimmed cilantro leaves
1/2 tsp. ground cumin – toasted from seed
2 tsp. salt, to taste


Directions:

Peel the tomatillos and ensure they are completely washed clean in cold water. Core and quarter them and place in a food processor. Blacken and stem the serranos. Add to the processor with the onion, mashed garlic cloves and cilantro. Pulse until finely-chopped, but not smooth. Add the salt and toasted ground cumin. Mix well and let stand for 1/2 hour before serving.

Serves 6-8
Heat Level: 7

Salsa Verde |Culinary Compost Recipes

Use a good-quality food processor when preparing salsa. You’ll save yourself a lot of time and produce more consistent results. Choose one with a large-capacity work bowl, strong motor and a pulse switch. Shown is a premium Breville® Sous Chef 12-cup food processor. The pulse feature allows you to quickly process ingredients with just a few pushes of the button. Note the consistency of the cut. The unit costs a lot more than your average processor, but you get what you pay for.

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Salsa de Habañero Yucatan


This is an authentic recipe from the Yucatan province of coastal Mexico. Its assembly is remarkably simple… like fresh salsa should be.

Adjust the ingredients based on your personal heat preference, what peppers you have available and how many guests you wish to torture. Keep in mind that the mighty habanero is one of the hottest peppers on earth, with the active heat compound, capsaicin measuring over 280,000 Scoville Heat Units. By contrast, a jalapeño pepper boasts a wimpy 6000 SHU. Pure capsaicin or “the heat essence” of a chili pepper is benchmarked at 15,000,000 SHU and this is the limit.

Now, after that bit of pyrotechnic introduction, it is pointless for me to stress further the need for extreme caution when handling habanero peppers. I could tell you some interesting stories, but the less said, the better. Use care when preparing them, and for God’s sake, avoid touching the peppers as much as possible or rubbing your eyes or other sensitive areas. Wash your hands with soap, lemon juice or rubbing alcohol afterwards. Your best bet would be wearing food service gloves.  En Fuego!!


Ingredients:

8-10 large, fresh green tomatillos (Mexican green tomatoes), husked, washed, cored and fine chopped.
2 jalapeño peppers, stemmed and fine chopped with seeds.
2 habanero peppers, stemmed and fine chopped with seeds.
2 garlic cloves, mashed
1/2 cup spanish onion, fine chopped
1 cup loosely-packed cilantro leaves, washed and fine chopped
1/2 to 1 tbs. salt
Juice from 1/8 lime (wedge)


Preparation:

Tomatillos produce a wonderful lime tasting/colored salsa that is the base for my milder Salsa Verde.

Fine chop the tomatoes with a very sharp knife, but do not puree into a mush.

Place in bowl, adding the fine chopped peppers and spices. Go easy on the salt, and taste often, keeping in mind that the ingredients will blend together over time – so do not overcompensate. Generally, the mix will become hotter if left to stand a bit.

Stir ingredients well and let sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour. If the water content of the tomatoes separates out in the bowl after a while, drain the salsa by placing it in a fine screen basket or colander and then place back into bowl.

The best thing about this salsa is watching the look on your guest’s faces.

Traditional Mexican Green Sauce


This is another traditional way to prepare green tomatillo salsa. The tomatillos are lightly simmered and then blended. Great over huevos rancheros, chimis or chips.
Thanks to Monica and Javier for the recipe!

Ingredients:

tomatillos
jalapeños
Spanish onion
cilantro
salt
water


Directions:

De-husk, wash, core and boil the tomatillos and trimmed jalapeños in water for 1-2 minutes.
Allow to cool for about 5 minutes.

Put tomatillos, jalapeños, salt, and a little water into blender. Pulse until smooth.
Pour into a bowl and allow to cool.

Chop up cilantro and onion and mix into salsa.

Taste and correct the seasoning if needed.

Salsa Verde


This is a wonderful recipe that uses green tomatillos. Tomatillos are Mexican tomatoes that have a papery husk around them. They have a very distinctive lime flavor that is thirst quenching on a hot day. Try this with iced tea and good quality corn chips.

Ingredients:

8-10 large, fresh green tomatillos, washed, husked, cored and fine chopped.
2 jalapeño peppers, stemmed and fine chopped with seeds.
2 garlic cloves, mashed
1/2 cup spanish onion, fine chopped
3 tbs. cilantro leaves, washed and fine chopped
1/2 to 1 tbs. salt
Drizzle of fresh-squeezed lime juice

Preparation:

Place the chopped tomatillos in a bowl and add the chopped peppers and spices. Go easy on the salt, and taste often, keeping in mind that the ingredients will blend together over time – so do not overcompensate. Generally, the mix will become hotter if left to stand a bit.

Stir ingredients well and let sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour. If the water content of the tomatoes separates out in the bowl after a while, drain the salsa by placing it in a fine screen basket or colander and then place back into bowl.

Salsa Verde |Culinary Compost Recipes

Use a good-quality food processor when preparing salsa. You’ll save yourself a lot of time and produce more consistent results. Choose one with a large-capacity work bowl, strong motor and a pulse switch. Shown is a premium Breville® Sous Chef 12-cup food processor. The pulse feature allows you to quickly process ingredients with just a few pushes of the button. Note the consistency of the cut. The unit costs a lot more than your average processor, but you get what you pay for.

Cabo Crab Salsa


This is a wonderful crab salsa recipe that uses green tomatillos. It is popular on the west coast of Mexico where seafood is plentiful. Tomatillos are Mexican tomatoes that have a papery husk around them. They have a very distinctive lime flavor that is thirst quenching on a hot day. Try this with iced tea, or a cold Corona and good quality corn chips.

When possible, use real crab meat. It’s very expensive but there really is no comparison to pollack. Do not let the onion or heat from the chilis overpower the crab. Less is more with this version. Experiment and leave out the onion if desired.

Ingredients:

8-10 large, fresh green tomatillos, husked, washed, cored and fine chopped.
8 oz. shredded crab meat or imitation crab (Alaskan pollack)
2-4 jalapeño peppers, stemmed and fine chopped
(don’t throw out the seeds or membrane.)
2 garlic cloves, mashed
1/4 cup spanish onion, fine chopped
1/2 cup cilantro leaves, washed and fine chopped
1/2 to 1 tbs. salt
Juice of 1/8 fresh lime

Preparation:

Place the chopped tomatillos in bowl, and add the chopped peppers and spices. Add the crab meat last and mix gently. Go easy on the salt, and taste often, keeping in mind that the ingredients will blend together over time – so do not overcompensate. Generally, the mix will become hotter if left to stand a bit.

Let sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour. If the water content of the tomatillos separates out in the bowl after a while, drain the salsa by ladling out the excess liquid with a tablespoon. This is normal as the salt will draw out the liquid from the tomatillos.