Mexican Chipotle-Lime Crema


Mexican Chipotle-Lime Crema Sauce | Culinary Compost Recipes

My version of a classic Mexican cream sauce, kicked up with zippy chipotle adobo and fresh-squeezed lime juice.

This condiment is a must on authentic Baja fish tacos. You can also serve it with huevos rancheros or as a dipping sauce for a variety of other needs. Double the recipe if you need more. Will keep for at least a week in your fridge.  Enjoy!

 

Ingredients:

1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup mayo (please do this dish justice and don’t use the low-fat version)
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 tbs. + 1/2 tsp. San Marcos chipotle adobo sauce
1/2 tsp. ground coriander
Buttermilk (used as a thinner, if necessary)

 

Place the ingredients in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Whisk vigorously for two minutes. If the sauce is too thick, thin it with a couple of tablespoons of buttermilk.
Either serve in a dish or place in a plastic squeeze bottle. Refrigerate for two hours before serving.

Makes one cup.

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Chipotle Gouda Cornbread


Chipotle Gouda Cornbread

A well-seasoned cast-iron pan is a must for cornbread. Let the pan heat in the oven before adding the batter — this will ensure a nice crust on the bottom.

The Gouda cheese and chipotle seasoning add a great, smokey undertone to this dish. A refreshing change from traditional cornbread. Moist and zippy – it’s a sure-fire crowd pleaser.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup corn meal
3 tbs. sugar
1 tbs. baking powder
1 tsp. dry chipotle powder
1/2 cup Gouda cheese, shredded

1/4 cup milk
1 egg, beaten
1 cup buttermilk
1 tbs. honey
1/2 stick butter, melted


Directions:

Heat the oven to 350 degrees F and spray a 12-cup muffin pan, or a 9″ cake pan or heavy cast-iron skillet, with non-stick spray.

In a large bowl mix the flour, corn meal, sugar, baking powder and chipotle powder until well combined.  Add the cheese and stir to combine.

In a separate bowl mix the egg, milk, honey or corn syrup, and butter.

Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour the liquid ingredients into it.  Fold the mixture gently, mixing until the dry ingredients are just moist.  Do not over-mix.

Scoop into the prepared muffin pan, filling each cup halfway with batter, or pour the batter into the prepared cake pan.

Bake for 18 to 20 minutes for muffins, or 25 to 30 for the cake pan.
Allow to cool in the pan for 3 minutes before turning out.

Yield: 18 muffins or one 9″ round loaf.

Chipotle Mayo


I’m going to assume you’ll be able to stay focused when assembling this recipe. Enjoy. Multiple uses.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons milk
1 or 2 smoked, canned chipotle chiles, minced

Preparation:

Mix well in a bowl and serve.

Chipotle Honey Dipping Sauce


Fantastic as a dipping sauce with shrimp or chicken.

Ingredients:

2 chipotle chiles, stemmed and seeded
1 tomato, cored and cut in quarters
1/2 small onion, peeled and sliced
1 clove garlic, peeled
1/2 cup water
l teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

Preparation:

In a small saucepan, bring chiles, tomato, water, onion, garlic and salt to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook, slowly, covered for 15 minutes, then puree in a blender until smooth transfer to a small bowl and add honey and vinegar. Serve at room temperature as a dipping sauce with shrimp or chicken.

Yield: 2 1/2 cups

Smokin’ Chipotle Salsa


The area around Santa Fe has a magical aura to it. It is timeless and beautiful. If I had a chance to live there, I couldn’t think of a better salsa to serve up for party guests.

Ingredients:

3 fresh large red tomatoes (8-10 Romas)
1 small spanish onion – minced
2 jalapeño peppers
1 tsp. chipotle powder (see preparation method below)
2 large cloves fresh minced garlic (a clove is 1 section of the whole bulb)
2-3 tbs. minced fresh cilantro
juice of 1/8 cut lime
1/2 tbs. salt
2 drops Hickory liquid smoke

Preparation:

Roma or Beefmaster tomatoes are preferred.

Fine chop the tomatoes and place in bowl. A food processor is ideal if you use restraint and don’t puree them into oblivion. Add the fine chopped peppers and spices. Go easy on the salt and use the liquid smoke with caution as it can quickly overpower the dish. Taste often (this is a good thing), keeping in mind that the ingredients will blend together over time—so do not overcompensate. Generally, the mix will become hotter if left to stand a bit.

Stir ingredients well and let stand for 1/2 hour. If the water content of the tomatoes separates out in the bowl after a while, drain the salsa by placing it in a fine screen basket or colander and then place back into bowl. This is normal. The water content will vary with different types of tomatoes. Romas on average have the lowest water content ratio.

Salsa best if used within two days. If you must put it in the fridge after use, let it warm up to room temperature again before serving.

Enjoy-
—my original recipe

Chipotle Powder
Chipotles (smoked jalapeños over a pecan-wood fire) are sold either dried as whole pods, dried and ground, or canned. With the increasing popularity of chipotle as a cooking spice, retailers have raised prices dramatically over the past few years. One pound of dried and ground chipotle powder currently goes for about $16 street price! Helpful tip—save yourself the money and grind your own by purchasing smaller amounts. They can commonly be found in most mexican markets or specialty supermarkets.

Here’s how:
Purchase a small bag of whole chipotle pods at a mexican market. Each bag usually is pre-packaged with about 10 pods and weighs about 3.5 ounces. The cost is about $2.59.

Using a small electric coffee or spice grinder and a sharp butcher knife, cut the pods into small sections and remove the stems. Then throw them in the grinder and pulverize them into a fine powder. One bag of pods should make you enough chipotle powder for at least a year—unless you’re a chili head like I am. Store the powder in an airtight container. I wash and reuse my empty Chinese hot mustard jars as they are virtually the same size as most spice jars and have a really nice lid.

Chipotle powder also works great as a rub for marinades with chicken, steak or fish.

Pineapple Chipotle Salsa


A sweet-spicy salsa that adds a refreshing change of pace. Pairs well with many fish recipes.

Ingredients:

1 (20 ounce) can pineapple slices in juice, drained
1/4 cup diced red bell pepper
2 tablespoons orange juice
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon packed brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons chipotle chile puree (see note)
salt to taste

Preparation:

In large nonstick skillet over medium heat, cook pineapple slices about 5 minutes, turning once, until golden brown on both sides. Remove from heat. Cut pineapple into 1/4-inch slices. In bowl, mix pineapple with remaining ingredients except chipotle puree and salt. Gradually mix in puree and taste until you obtain a heat level you like, then season with salt. Cover and set aside. Makes about 1- 1/3 cups.

Note:
With electric blender, puree 1 (7 ounce) can San Marcos® chipotle chiles in adobo sauce. After making pineapple salsa, remaining puree can be frozen in small container and used as needed.

High Plains Chipotle Salsa


If Clint Eastwood’s western character had a favorite salsa — this would be it. The chipotle adds just the right touch of smoky flavor and attitude. Think you can handle that, hombre?

Enjoy — my original recipe.


Ingredients:

3 fresh large red tomatoes (8-10 Romas)
1 small spanish onion – minced
1 jalapeño pepper
1/2 of one small can San Marcos® Mexican Chipotle peppers in adobo sauce—minced
2 large cloves fresh minced garlic (a clove is 1 section of the whole bulb)
2-3 tbs. minced fresh cilantro
juice of 1/8 cut lime
1/2 tbs. salt


Preparation:

Roma or Beefmaster tomatoes are preferred.

Fine chop the tomatoes and place in bowl. A food processor is ideal if you use restraint and don’t puree them into oblivion. Add the fine chopped peppers and spices. Go easy on the salt, as the canned chipotle peppers are packed in adobo sauce which is loaded with salt itself. Taste often (this is a good thing), keeping in mind that the ingredients will blend together over time—so do not overcompensate. Generally, the mix will become hotter if left to stand a bit.

Stir ingredients well and let stand for 1/2 hour. If the water content of the tomatoes separates out in the bowl after a while, drain the salsa by placing it in a fine screen basket or colander and then place back into bowl. This is normal. The water content will vary with different types of tomatoes. Romas on average have the lowest water content ratio.

Salsa best if used within two days. If you must put it in the fridge after use, let it warm up to room temperature again before serving.